Voxer Launches Easy Talk Widget on Android, Allowing Quick Access to Walkie-Talkie Chats

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The basis of the post is to make you think about what in life is important and what does getting the new Walkie talkie really represent to us

Mobile push to talk pioneer Voxer has just released an update for Android that includes its brand new Easy Talk widget for Android users. The new widget allows you to quickly access your most important chats and listen to live and recorded voice messages. You can also send audio, texts or images right from the lock screen or home screen.

“Voxer’s goal is to facilitate instantaneous communication and make it easy for users to quickly contact each other, reducing the time it takes to send and receive messages,” the company said of the update in a press release. “This is especially important for businesses, where time saved on communication can lead to benefits like cost savings. The Easy Talk widget is designed to help users communicate faster, enabling them to send and receive messages without unlocking their Android device.”

“REPLACING TRADITIONAL TWO-WAY RADIOS AND OTHER COMMUNICATION DEVICES WITH VOXER”

Some features of the Easy Talk widget include:

  • Access from home or lock screen: Users have access to several Voxer features right from the widget, which includes listening and sending voice messages, texts and images.
  • Prioritize important chats: Users can select specific chats that are the most important to them, and add them to the widget. They can access these chats by tapping on the next and previous buttons within the widget.
  • Send and receive live audio: Voice messages can be streamed live for the chat that is visible on the widget, so the user can have constant access to voice messages, even when the Voxer app is not open on their device.
  • Headset integration: The widget streams live audio to headsets, so users can communicate via their headset for easy access.

“Our customers are replacing their traditional two-way radios and other communication devices with Voxer,” said Irv Remedios, head of product, Voxer. “With this widget, we can replicate the live characteristics of traditional PTT, in addition to other features that can help users communicate faster. Android users can organize their chats, providing easy access to the ones that are the most important. With Easy Talk, users can communicate faster than ever before.”

The Easy Talk widget is now available for Voxer Pro and Voxer Business customers with Android devices running 2.3.5 and above.

Read more at http://www.trutower.com/2014/04/23/voxer-push-to-talk-launches-easytalk-feature-android/#MAJCJ5urdE4lBJDi.99

Where Can I Get An Earpiece Like The One James Bond Uses In Skyfall?

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The earpiece used by Bond in the Macau scenes is a Phonex Invisity Flex Miniature Receiver. Sadly, if you want to buy one, you either need to work for MI6, or else fork out £1,500 of your hard-earned dosh.

The earpiece you will be far more likely to buy is a Micro Spy Bluetooth Earpiece and it’s quite a handy little gadget. At £70, it isn’t cheap, but its considerably cheaper than the ‘official’ version, wouldn’t you say?

Now, as for your second question:

‘Skyfall’ was an awesome movie. I’ll tell you a little story. When I was a boy, I loved James Bond movies. Loved ‘em. I was a huge Sean Connery fan (to my mum, Connery was the definitive Bond, so those were the movies we watched). Although I enjoyed the outlandish concepts of ‘Live & Let Die’ and ‘Moonraker’, the Roger Moore era doesn’t stand up quite as well for me. Moore didn’t seem to be tough in the same way that Connery did. Of course, I’m a 90’s kid, so Pierce Brosnan was our Bond. However, although he’s a very good actor, Brosnan’s stories seemed very silly to me and I never really warmed to him as 007.

In ‘Casino Royale’ Daniel Craig’s Bond was, for me at least, a return to the Connery-era 007 of my childhood. This Bond was a physical, dominating presence. He was violent, narcissistic and damaged, but hid it so well under a veneer of detachment and charm.

I didn’t like ‘Quantum of Solace’ as much, to be honest. It looked amazing and the stunt work was some of the best I’ve ever seen, but the plot just seemed to go nowhere for me. I felt the villains were extremely one-dimensional (a corrupt Latin American general and an American businessman? Come on) and the story just lacked ‘oomph’ (for want of a better term).

‘Skyfall’ was the best of the Craig movies so far in my opinion. We got an awesome villain (Javier Bardem was beyond wonderful), the best M story ever told and an emotional and layered story. Plus, we got Q, Moneypenny, cars, guns, girls and Bond. So yeah, I loved it. 

How does two way radio work

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A walkie-talkie or 2 way radio is a battery-powered transceiver (meaning that it can both transmit and receive radio signals). Walkie-talkies receive radio waves via an antenna and can also broadcast return signals (on the same frequency) via the same device.

A walkie-talkie essentially converts incoming signal into sound and outgoing sound into signal.

The antenna on a walkie-talkie is home to various groups of electrons. These electrons respond to specific, pre-set channels (different groups respond to different channels). When the walkie-talkie antenna intercepts radio waves, the electrons translate those radio waves into electrical impulses, which then pass through the device and into a small processor, housed within the walkie-talkie itself.

How do Walkie Talkies work

The processor, in turn, converts the impulses into a signal, which is then played back by the speakers.  This is not at all unlike the process of hearing as undertaken by the Human ear. The speakers vibrate to the same pattern as they did when the sender of the signal spoke into their own device, replicating exactly what was broadcast from their end.

For an outgoing signal, the vibrations that make up a Human voice rattle a small membrane inside the microphone. The walkie-talkie’s processor then converts those vibrations into an electrical impulse. The impulse is pushed outwards, towards the antenna, where it is transmitted over the desired audio channel. From there, the process takes place in the opposite order. It is, however, the same process every time.

Interestingly, mobile phone technology is basically the same as walkie-talkie/two-way radio technology. The major difference, however, is that whereas walkie-talkies are only have a half duplex channel (meaning that only one signal can be sent or received at any given time), mobile phones are full duplex, meaning that two signals can be sent and received simultaneously.

Another major difference is that mobiles rely on nearby cellular towers in order to get a signal, whereas walkie-talkies utilise a point-to-point system, communicating between individual handsets and also devices called ‘repeaters’, which boost overall signal strength by blocking out specific channels.

Of course, because there is only one channel featured on a walkie-talkie, only one person can speak at any given time, whereas mobile phones can broadcast conversations that are identical to those between two face-to-face people.

The success of walkie-talkies likely lies with their innate simplicity. The process by which a transceiver works is as clear and uncluttered a process as one could wish for. 

How does an aeroplane’s ‘black box’ work?

After doing a little research, I can now tell you (basically) everything you ever wanted to know about black boxes…

In the average commercial aircraft, you’ll find the presence of multiple (usually four) microphones in the cockpit at any given time. They are located in the pilot and co-pilot’s headsets, as well as in the cockpit itself. Not only do these microphones record conversations between the pilots and cabin crew, they also record any ambient noise (such as switches being thrown or sounds generated by technical issues). The microphones all connect to the cockpit voice recorder (CVR), a master unit that stores the last 30 minutes of sound. The tape operates on a loop, essentially erasing itself every half hour.

This device is known colloquially, but a little misleadingly, as the ‘black box’ (it is usually quite brightly coloured in order to make it easier to find in the unlikely event of an accident). Another device also referred to as a ‘black box’, is the flight data recorder (FDR), which automatically records data regarding the plane’s flight path, speed and movements in the air. Although the devices are distinct from one another, the information they record goes to the same place and is used for the same purpose, thus their shared name of ‘black box’.

In recent years, manufacturers have moved away from magnetic tape-based CVRs and FDRs and towards ‘solid state technology’ boxes. These improved devices store the relevant data on memory boards, which can hold up to two hours of cockpit recording and 25 hours of flight data. The solid-state devices are also sturdier than their tape-based counterparts.

Crash survivable memory units (CMSUs), are large cylinders that back up all the relevant data and are designed to withstand extreme heat, pressure and violent impact. They are typically contained within the box itself. In the more severe accidents, the CMSU is all that survives of the black box.

The black box, then, simply records all the relevant data before an accident occurs. This serves to provide engineers with an explanation for a crash, as well as providing investigators and regulators with the same information.

So there you have it, of course, a lot of information is stored in an aircraft’s black box (much more than I’ve detailed here), but as a general example, that’s what it is and how it works. Hope that helps.