Diverse Power Leverages Exalt Backhaul for Large-Scale UHF Radio Network

Again one more piece i found fascinating around the subject of 2 way radio’s, what would you need to do if i didn’t post this ehh? you would have to find the initial article, and the chances you found it would be slim, so think yourself lucky that i have shared this excellent piece with you.

 

Exalt Communications, Inc., the leading innovator of next-generation wireless connectivity systems for private networks and Internet infrastructures, today announced that Diverse Power, an electric membership cooperative based in La Grange, GA has deployed Exalt ExploreAir microwave backhaul systems to link traffic from its TETRA UHF radio network back to its fiber core.

With 36,000 customers throughout counties in Georgia and Alabama, Diverse Power’s far-flung operations in this rural area require highly reliable radio communications among its maintenance personnel. Working with Exalt partner Dean’s Commercial Two-Way of Cataula, GA, Diverse Power deployed a TETRA UHF radio system for its workers and selected Exalt ExploreAir microwave backhaul systems to carry traffic among sites in Manchester, Mulberry Grove, and Red Oak, GA.

“We wanted a first-class system all the way with our radio network, and Dean’s Two Way recommended Exalt for its outstanding performance and reasonable price,” said Randy Shepard, senior vice president of Diverse Power. “Exalt gives us a fiber-speed backhaul infrastructure that we can rely on in all weather conditions, even during the recent ice storms.”

Diverse Power deployed Exalt ExploreAir systems in all-outdoor configurations on links between Mulberry Grove and Manchester, and between Red Oak and Manchester. The systems carry 100 megabits per-second of Ethernet traffic. While the microwave systems backhaul voice radio traffic today, Diverse Power is looking ahead to carrying SCADA traffic over the links in the future.

“Fiber and microwave are the only technologies that can reliably backhaul traffic, and Exalt microwave offers customers distinct advantages when expanding a network over a broad geographical area,” said Amir Zoufonoun, CEO of Exalt. “Our systems are scalable, providing customers like Diverse Power the capacity they need to optimize energy delivery, increase productivity, enable two-way information exchange with customers for greater control over their electricity costs, and easily add future service offerings.”

About Exalt Communications

Exalt Communications, Inc. is a forerunner in the global Internet revolution, delivering high-value wireless systems that transform the economics of connectivity. Exalt wireless systems extend or complement network fiber and replace now-outdated copper, enabling customers to accelerate time-to-market, optimize network performance, and reduce network infrastructure costs. Today, over 2,000 global customers, from the world’s largest mobile operators to independent service providers, government agencies, and multinational enterprises depend on Exalt systems as they move their applications to the Cloud, enable mobility, and connect the unconnected.

Read more at http://www.broadwayworld.com/bwwgeeks/article/Diverse-Power-Leverages-Exalt-Backhaul-for-Large-Scale-UHF-Radio-Network-20140402#VrUcmLhd4WjO3IKs.99

Inventors That Changed the World: Al Gross

Much like Arnold Schwarzenegger’s character in the movie ‘Twins’, the walkie-talkie can claim to have many fathers. However, one of the most prominent names in the debate (and maybe the one with the single strongest claim to having invented the walkie-talkie) is Canadian/American inventor Al Gross.

The son of Romanian immigrants, Al Gross was born in Toronto, Canada in 1918, but his parents moved to Cleveland, Ohio, USA when he was quite young. Whilst on a steamboat trip across Lake Erie, the 9-year-old Gross encountered radio technology for the first time and, in so doing, ignited a passion within him that would change the world.

How passionate was he? By age 12, Gross had turned his parents’ basement into a radio centre. The bright young man would visit junkyards and salvage any material he thought he could use. Four years later –aged 16- Gross was awarded an amateur radio license, which was still in effect at the time of his death in 2000.

At the age of 18, Gross enrolled in the Case School of Applied Sciences. At the time, radio frequencies above 100MHz were relatively unexplored territory. Gross wanted to see exactly what could be done with them. He wanted to create a mobile, lightweight, handheld transceiver, using those uncharted frequencies. In 1938, he did just that, patenting the two-way radio, or ‘walkie-talkie’. He was just 20 years old.

War arrived on American shores in 1941 with the attack on Pearl Harbour. America scrambled to mobilize its armed forces and take advantage of any/all new technology that could aid the struggle against the Axis powers. The US Office of Strategic Services (OSS) – a forerunner to the CIA – tapped Gross to create an air-to-ground communications’ system. The system Gross designed employed Hertzian radio waves and was almost impossible for the enemy to monitor, even when allied planes were in enemy airspace. Gross’ system proved incredibly successful (so much so, that it was not declassified until 1976).

After the war, the inventor turned entrepreneur and founded the Citizens Radio Corporation, which took advantage of the first frequencies designated for personal use. His company was the first to receive FCC approval for use with the new ‘citizens’ band’. He licensed radios to other companies and supplied units to the Coast Guard, amongst others.

Then, in 1949 came another amazing discovery. Gross invented and patented the telephone pager. He invented the system with doctors in mind, but the medical community was (amazingly) slow to respond to this new technology. Only New York’s Jewish Hospital saw the potential of the pager as a life-saving device, when they implemented it in 1950.

Throughout the 1950’s, Gross, ever the pioneer, fought hard to garner interest for his newest idea – a mobile telephone. It took him eight years to get mobile telephony, as a concept, off the ground. Talk about being ahead of the curve!

Unfortunately, many of Gross’ best ideas were so far ahead of said curve, that his patents ran out before he could garner the profit his genius deserved. Had he earned the money eventually generated by CB radio, pagers and cellular phones, he would have died an extremely rich man. However, it was not to be.

Gross invented a lot throughout the years, but nothing brought him the amount of money that he potentially could have made from his earlier inventions. However, Gross was able to make a comfortable living, spending the 1960’s working for large corporations as a specialist in communications systems. 

In the 1990’s, he was employed as a Senior Staff Engineer for Orbital Sciences Corporation in Arizona, where he worked on satellite communications, military equipment and aerospace technology.

As an older man, Gross got the most joy from visiting local schools and giving presentations. He took extra pleasure in inspiring the next generation of scientists, engineers and thinkers.

In April of the year 2000, Al Gross (who had garnered numerous awards throughout his career, far too many to write about here) was honoured to receive the Lemelson-MIT Lifetime Achievement Award. He passed away eight months later in December 2000.

Gross never actually retired and was still working at the age of 82, a restless paragon of forward thinking, innovation and tireless imagination.

SOURCE

http://web.mit.edu/invent/iow/gross.html

Here’s a Brief History of Headphones

Article of the Day………ok so i haven’t got an article seven days a week, but if i get a chance I will post articles that I find fascinating. Lucky enough here’s one of those articles that I read and had to share. If you enjoy it as much as me, please add one of those special social media likes, you know the one that tells everybody that you loved something, rather than you sat on your arse and watched Television!

During the past century, human ears have enjoyed less freedom than ever before, but more music, thanks to the invention of headphones. In 1910, a Nathaniel Baldwin invented headphones in the kitchen of his Utah home, forever subjecting our ears to the shackles of small speakers.

Aside from allowing you to furtively listen to the latest Carly Rae Jepsen single, headphones enable people to privately and individually interact with media, even when in a noisy room or a crowded subway. Headphones are also crucial tools used for recording music, and producing films, TV and radio programming.

Here is a timeline of how we’ve gone from Baldwin’s “Baldy Phones” to Apple’s earbuds EarPods and “Beats by Dre.”

1910: Nathaniel Baldwin Invents the First Headphones

The legend states that Lt. Comdr. A. J. Hepburn of the U.S. Navy received for prototype for a pair of telephones fashioned into a headset, along with a letter from Nathaniel Baldwin written with purple ink on blue and pink paper. After initially disregarding the message, Hepburn tested the device and found that it worked surprisingly well to transmit sound.

The Navy began to ask for more headphones from Baldwin, who could only accept orders of 10 at a time because he was producing them in his kitchen.

If it’s not evident from his choice of stationery and writing utensil, Baldwin was an interesting fellow. He was a fundamentalist Mormon who studied at Brigham Young Academy (later renamed Brigham Young University), and eventually earned an electrical engineering degree from Stanford.

He returned to BYU as a professor but was fired for speaking out in favor of polygamy, a practice which the Mormon Church renounced in 1890. (Though he endorsed polygamy, he had only one wife.)

Original Koss SP3 Headphones1958: John C. Koss Introduces SP3 Stereophones, Made For Music

Until this point, people used headphones almost exclusively for radio communication.

John Koss was born and raised in Wisconsin. He got married in 1952, at which time he started a business using a cash wedding gift with which him and his bride were supposed to buy a sofa, according to the Wisconsin Historical Society.

While introducing a portable phonograph he wanted to rent to patients in Milwaukee hospitals, he revealed the original Koss SP3 Stereophones. Initially intended to be a sidebar, the headphones proved revolutionary because their sound quality made them optimal for listening to music. The Koss Corporation, located in Milwaukee, is still making headphones today.

1979: Sony Releases ‘Walkman,’ Headphones Go on a Diet

Before portable music players, headphones tended to be big. Baldwin’s original set weighed upwards of a pound.

Koss’ stereophones were circumaural, meaning the earpads would literally engulf your ears. It made sense at the time. “Audiophiles” could listen to the latest Beatles, Pink Floyd and Led Zeppelin albums in the comfort of their homes, and the bulbus design of their headphones helped to block outside noise.

With the help of the Sony “Walkman,” recorded music soon liberated itself from the home stereo, creating a need for more portable headphones. Conveniently, a lightweight set of MDR-3L2 headphones was included with the portable cassette player. As opposed to Koss’ circumaural headphones, Sony’s were supra-aural, meaning the earpads pressed against the ears.

 

 

1989: Dr. Amar Bose Introduces the First Noise-Reducing Headset

On a flight home from Zurich in 1978, Dr. Amar Bose tried an early set of electronic headphones that were newly onboard for passenger entertainment — but he could barely hear anything with the overwhelming cabin noise. He returned to Boston and set up a research program at Bose Corporation (which he founded in 1964), to investigate how ambient noise could be reduced with active noise cancellation. The Noise Reduction Technology Group (NRTG) grew out of that program, and in 1989, the company introduced the first noise-reduction headset, designed for the aviation industry.

2001: Apple iPod Includes Earbuds, Which Now Total 600 Million

The trend towards smaller and more portable headphones eventually led to earbuds and in-earphones, which only differ in the degree to which they wedge into the ear canal.

In 2001, Apple introduced the iPod to the world. The iPod, and later iPhone and iPad, comes with a now-iconic set of basic white earbuds. A decade later, iPod sales have topped 300 million. Begin to do the math, totaling sales of iPods, iPhones and iPads, and you begin to realize there are an astronomical number of Apple earbuds in circulation.

During the announcement of a long-awaited upgrade the company’s stock headset at the iPhone 5 unveiling on Sept. 12, Apple said that it had shipped 600 million sets of the first generation of earbuds — that’s roughly one for every 12 people on the planet. Regardless of your opinion on the quality of the product, those earbuds get around.

2008: Beats by Dr. Dre Hits the Market

Hip hop artist and producer Dr. Dre teamed up with Interscope Chairman Jimmy Iovine to launch Beats by Dr. Dre, helping to solidifying headphones as a fashion statement. The brand has recruited celebrities, including Will.i.am, Justin Bieber, Lady Gaga and Lebron James, to endorse the products. Today, Beats by Dr. Dre has 63% market share in U.S. for headphones priced over $100.

2011: Sennheiser Sells $40,000 Orpheus Headphones, World’s Most Expensive

At an audio show in Seoul, South Korea, the German headphone company Sennheiser unveiled the world’s most expensive headphones. The company released 300 sets of the Orpheus headphones, which were priced at 30,000 Euros, or roughly $41,000 a piece.

If you’re still on the fence about making that big of an investment, try them out with the following video.

2012: Apple Redefines Earbuds with the EarPods

The launch of the iPhone 5 ushered in a new era of headphone design — the EarPod. The periscope-like headphones are designed to direct sound right into the ear, and they hold up pretty well.


Headphones have come a long way in the past 100 years, revolutionizing the way we consume media and the way we communicate. In addition to sets that transmit with extremely high fidelity, other notable advancements include wireless headphones, Bluetooth headsets and headsets that include a microphone which can be connected to telephones or computers.

As portable media consumption continues to rise with smartphones and tablets, the need for headphones will be greater than ever.

Source – http://mashable.com/2012/09/26/headphones/

Orwigsburg council approves radio purchase for communications system update

Thankyou for reading my blog, here is a piece of writing i really enjoyed reading. With their authorization i’m able to repost it. I compose many of my own articles, but sporadically repost other content i think are interesting, thankyou for reading.

The borough council approved the purchase of six radios to use with the recent emergency communications system updates to the police department at a cost of $27,000 at its Wednesday meeting.

Under new federal regulations, the county’s emergency management communications network must be converted to a narrowband frequency to make it more efficient. The county is in the process of complying with Federal Communications Commission-required upgrades to emergency communications.

The borough ordered six Motorola APX6000 radios from Green’s Communications, Pottsville, on Friday. Three radios will be placed in the cars and three are for officers to carry.

The radios could take four weeks to arrive, borough Manager Mike Lonergan said.

In other news, the council also voted to approve a proposal by the Exeter Ambulance Association, Berks County, for two Automated External Defibrillators.

The cost for the AEDs is $4,200. They will replace one for the police department that is at least 10 years old, Lonergan said.

Also at the meeting, Lonergan said he will apply for a $40,000 grant through the state Department of Conservation and Natural Resources for new playground equipment at Community Memorial Hall, mulch and other park maintenance.

The playground equipment that is in good shape, such as the jungle gym, merry-go-round and seesaw, would not need to be replaced. However, the swing set is about 20 years old and could be removed or relocated to another park in the borough, Lonergan said.

The deadline to apply for the grant is Wednesday, and the borough could know by the fall if the grant is awarded. A $20,000 match by the borough would be required and would be paid through by funds designated for recreation use.

In other council action, approval was granted for Lonergan to prepare a final agreement between the borough and Schuylkill County Municipal Authority for the supplemental operation and maintenance services for the borough water and wastewater systems after review by the borough solicitor Frank Tamulonis and an engineer from SCMA.

The cost to the borough for the service is $1,850 per month and would likely start this month. The borough previously gave approval to execute a memorandum of understanding with the authority to provide the aforementioned support.

The council also authorized Tamulonis to advertise an ordinance for declarations of taking or using eminent domain to obtain easements for the safe routes to schools project if necessary. The project would involve curbs and sidewalks from downtown Market Street to Blue Mountain Elementary East along Red Dale Road for a total of about 1,200 feet, Lonergan said.

The borough was awarded a $303,000 grant in 2009 through the Safe Routes to Schools Program through the state Department of Transportation.

“We do not anticipate the ordinance being necessary,” Lonergan said. However, if it is, the borough would compensate property owners.