Virtual Reality Coming to Your In-Flight Entertainment?

2016 was the year of the Virtual reality headset, we are seeing the first versions of a technology that can, and possibly will, change our lives, much like the smart phone has. VR has the potential to improve our Games, TV programmes and Movies and allow us to experience things and places better. This article is about how your in-flight might be improved by a VR headsets.

No one likes flying during the holidays. Between having to leave two hours ahead of time and getting through security, just getting to your flight feels like a trip in itself. And then you get on the plane and have nothing to do for three hours except watch reruns of Friends on the little TV in front of you.

That’s probably about to change, thanks to VR. For a little while, of course, passengers can plug into their own Samsung Gear VR sets and tune out, but airlines might be offering their own complimentary variety so you can forget you’re stuck on an airplane.

A French start-up, SkyLights, is developing the tech. It’s a headset with a six-hour battery life, and it comes with noise-cancelling headphones. The headset looks pretty sleek and simple, because they’re made to be: There’s none of the neater interactions you get with an Oculus or Samsung headset. It really is just a movie beamed right into your face. You’ll be able to watch the newest 2D and 3D movies, and the set comes with 128 GB of storage — about 40 movies. Weighing only slightly more than half a pound, it’s easy to visualize the headset propped on the back of the seat in front of you, and after paying the fee, you can flip it on and enjoy hi-def movies right in front of your face.

The headsets are being tested in France right now: XL Airways became the first headset to offer a commercial version of the headset to passengers last week, for $16 per flight. SkyLights has also partnered with AirFrance and Airbus. Content-wise, there are partnerships in the works with 20th Century Fox and Dreamworks.

The general lack of viable in-flight entertainment has been plaguing the airline industry for a while; broadband Internet is an extra cost (roughly $10 per flight, depending on your airline), and the movies and TV they show are typically outdated.

It wasn’t until recently that airlines began attempting to match the broadband speed you’d find on the ground. (As of last year, you’d get speeds of around 3.1Mbps, as opposed to the roughly 30Mbps that smartphones on the ground are capable of). Since so many people use their own devices for entertainment, airlines are in desperate need of upping their Wi-Fi speed. But they also need ways to entertain their customers in an inexpensive manner, without the heavy screens and cables that come with TVs. Virtual-reality headsets — light, not-too-costly, and wireless — could offer a way for airlines to draw their customer base back in. But there are challenges: VR headsets are a relatively new and untested technology.

“Airlines are difficult players to deal with because they are risk-averse and slow to innovate,” David Dicko, SkyLight’s CEO, told the Times.

One potential problem for in-flight VR in your face is the nausea it causes. VR (even if it’s just a film) can be very disorienting, and it’s not hard to imagine people getting sick from it on a moving plane. Oculus’ health and safety documentation is a laundry list of potential concerns, from warnings of dizziness and nausea to seizures and sweating.

Another potential issue could be that hundreds of folks tuned out to a VR movie with noise-cancelling headphones have, at the least, limited awareness of the outside world. That means slowness to react in plane emergencies — another potential lawsuit on an airline’s hands.

For now, we’re skeptical that VR headsets will take off as in-flight entertainment in the U.S. anytime soon. Early adopters might be eager to try them — but they also have their own headsets that they can use for free. Customers would have to pay over the price of a movie ticket, the technology is unstudied when it comes to users’ health, and everyone has their own phone or tablet to entertain themselves. We love the idea, but, as Dicko noted, the airlines are a pretty risk-averse industry. They should prioritize Wi-Fi bandwidth first (and make it at least cheaper), which is what the majority of customers undoubtedly want.

Anyway, it’s hard to imagine a more Black Mirror–esque image than a hundred people, arranged into rows, their heads leaning back, eyes hidden behind a headset, plugged in to a world that isn’t there.

Here Are Our Seven Best Headsets You Can Use At Your Event

There are many instances where people get confused when talking about types of headsets and the associated equipment. In this article, we are going to help you get a clear understanding of the different types of headsets and the associated equipment. With that said, it is important to note that the names that have been given below, are the actual names that need to be used. Without any further ado, lets get started;

In Ear Monitors

Also known as in-ear (or canal) headphones, these devices sit inside the user’s ear canal, and they deliver great sound quality; they ensure a controlled and precise sound. They also fill the ear’s entrance, thus are very effective at sealing out any unwanted external noise. These devices include a transmitter which is controlled by an audio engineer which then transmits to the belt-pack on the user. The in ear monitors allow freedom of movement and are commonly used by modern pop artists. They’re very small and allow them to comfortably hear the rest of the band, and also themselves (this is what’s known as monitoring or foldback). Apart from artists, these devices are commonly used by audio engineers to hear the mix of the vocals and the stage instrumentation for recording studio mixing and/or live performance.

2 Way Radio Headsets

Two way radio headset is a communication device which can transmit and also receive signals. A two way radio headset allows the user to communicate with other people with similar 2 way radio headsets (and are operating on the same channel or radio frequency). 2 way radio headsets are readily available in mobile and also hand held portable configurations . The handheld Two way radio headsets are also known as walkie talkie headsets or handie talkies. One thing to note about two way radio headsets, is that the user can either transmit or receive signals and not both at the same time.

Two Way Radio Covert Pieces

These are quite similar to the 2 way radios, however, they are much more discreet. 2 way radio covert earpieces are usually used by security personnel as they prefer staying discreet. This type of walkie talkie headset is also ideal for the Door supervisors and security staff.

Wired Show Comms

Unlike Two way radios, these type of communication systems allow for both talking and listening even at the same time. These devices have a closed cup design, meaning they fully cover the ear which helps reduce the ambient noise. Wired show comms come in single muff and double muff versions. They get attached to the belt pack controller which is then physically wired to the system. Because of the cabling that’s involved in wired show comms, there’s less mobility thus are best suited for managers and the static technicians. These specialist communication devices are also commonly used for calling shows.

Wireless Show Comms

These are very similar to the wired Show Comms, only difference is that their belt packs are wireless. The device and the belt pack are compatible which means that the users can freely and comfortably move around, thus are ideal for stage managers, front of house managers, among others. Just like the wired show comms, these devices also allow both talking and listening at the same. With that said, you should know that the wireless show comms are relatively more expensive than the wired show comms. Some of the other applications for these devices include, but not limited to; security personnel, broadcast, marines, theater, and colleges. They can also serve as convenient walkie talkie headset for events.

Radio Performer Headset

This is the device that’s used by presenters and performers. This device allows for the user’s voice to get fed into the sound system where the audience can get to hear them. This device is usually used in conjunction with the radio belt pack system. Most of the devices used today are generally very thin and skin colored which helps reduce visibility when the performer is on stage.

Presenter Talkback

These are the small ear pieces which you see the lead presenters on TV talk shows wearing. This device allows the producer (of that particular TV talkshow or program), to communicate to the lead presenter and update them on the show’s progress. This may be done using a system known as in ear monitoring. Alternatively, wireless show comms systems can also be used.